Health Benefits of Yoghurt





Qualified as a good source of calcium , phosphorus, Vitamin B2 , iodine,Vitamin B12,Vitamin B5, Zinc, potassium, protein and molybdenum. It is a health-supportive food.

But the most interesting health information about yogurt comes from its potential inclusion of live bacteria. People who are moderately lactose-intolerant can consume yoghurt without ill effects, because much of the lactose in the milk precursor is converted to lactic acid by the bacterial culture.

Yoghurt containing live cultures is sometimes used in an attempt to prevent antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

Yoghurt contains varying amounts of fat . There is non-fat (0% fat), low-fat (usually 2% fat) and plain or whole milk yoghurt (4% fat).

Benefits of Yogurt:

1. Yogurt is easier to digest than milk. While the amount varies among brands of yogurt, in general, yogurt has less lactose than milk. The culturing process has already broken down the milk sugar lactose into two sugars that are easily absorbed by lactose-intolerant persons.

2. Yogurt contributes to colon health. Yogurt contains lactobacteria, intestines-friendly bacterial cultures that foster a healthy colon, and even lower the risk of colon cancer. Lactobacteria, especially acidophilus, promotes the growth of healthy bacteria in the colon and reduces the conversion of bile into carcinogenic bile acids. The more of these intestines-friendly bacteria that are present in your colon, the lower the chance of colon diseases.

Also, the bacteria in yogurt seems to deactivate harmful substances (such as nitrates and nitrites before they are converted to nitrosamines) before they can become carcinogenic.

Yogurt is a rich source of calcium - a mineral that contributes to colon health and decreases the risk of colon cancer

3. Yogurt improves the bioavailability of other nutrients. Culturing of yogurt increases the absorption of calcium and B-vitamins. The lactic acid in the yogurt aids in the digestion of the milk calcium, making it easier to absorb.

4. Yogurt can boost immunity. The bacterial cultures in yogurt have also been shown to stimulate infection-fighting white cells in the bloodstream. Some studies have shown yogurt cultures to contain a factor that has anti-tumor effects in experimental animals.

5. Yogurt aids healing after intestinal infections. It's good to eat yogurt while taking antibiotics. The yogurt will minimize the effects of the antibiotic on the friendly bacteria in the intestines.

6. Yogurt can decrease yeast infections. Research has shown that eating eight ounces of yogurt that contains live and active cultures daily reduces the amount of yeast colonies in the vagina and decreases the incidence of vaginal yeast infections.

7. Yogurt is a rich source of calcium. An 8-ounce serving of most yogurts provides 450 mg. of calcium, one-half of a child's RDA and 30 to 40 percent of the adult RDA for calcium

8. Yogurt contains protein. Plain yogurt contains around ten to fourteen grams of protein (often called "predigested") per eight ounces.

9. Yogurt can lower cholesterol. There are a few studies that have shown that yogurt can reduce the blood cholesterol. This may be because the live cultures in yogurt can assimilate the cholesterol or because yogurt binds bile acids.

10. Yogurt is a "grow food." Two nutritional properties of yogurt may help children with intestinal absorption problems grow: the easier digestibility of the proteins and the fact that the lactic acid in yogurt increases the absorption of minerals.

11. For Fresh Breath and a Healthy Mouth . Consuming just 3.2 ounces (90 grams) of yogurt twice a day not only lowers levels of hydrogen sulfide and other volatile sulfide compounds responsible for bad breath, but may also eliminate tongue-coating bacteria and reduce dental plaque formation, cavities, and risk for gingivitis.

Be careful when selecting yogurt and choose yogurts that contain live cultures—highest quality products will often indicate exactly how many live bacteria are contained in the product. Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus.




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